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captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: with no compromise in sight for a deficit deal, president obama pressed his case at the home of a middle class family in virginia today, part of his pitch to extend tax cuts for all but the very wealthy. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we update the state of the negotiations and examine the push to make changes to social security and medicare. >> brown: then, margaret warner looks at the political strife in egypt, after deadly clashes in the streets and resignations by top officials. >> woodruff: we have a battleground dispatch from a coastal city facing rising sea levels and the next big storm. >> if sandy were to come close r directly into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high s
>> brown: then, margaret warner looks at the political strife in egypt, after deadly clashes in the streets and resignations by top officials. >> woodruff: we have a battleground dispatch from a coastal city facing rising sea levels and the next big storm. >> if sandy were to come close or directly into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology,
at what's at stake with marcia coyle of "the national law journal." >> brown: hari sreenivasan reports on the threat to the shellfish industry from coast to coast, as ocean temperatures rise and the waters are more acidic. >> this is a very dramatic change that has not been seen in the worlds oceans for more than 50 million years. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and gwen ifill sits down with michael beschloss, whose recent foray into the twitter-verse has opened up a new way to view history in the digital age. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: more people found work in november and more people stopped looking for work. as a result, the number of new jobs came in better than expected today and the rate of unemployment was the lowest s
. >> the the cause is near and dear to this family. breast cancer awareness. linda brown is a 21 year survivor. ingly had wonderful doctors but nowhere to go. the loss of hair, all that kind of stuff. >> brown has seen is progression of pink and the commitment of the cause continue to grow just like the trees on the family's 85-acre farm. she wants to give back donating proceeds to a research center. >> every pink tag will be donated $5. >> jamie brown and his girlfriend are leading the charge. >> to live through what may mother lived through. i was there, i was young. it is very hard to watch it happen. not know whether your mother will come home or not is a big thing. >> cameron knows what that is like. his mother died of breast company four years ago. he worked with the browns ten years. it didn't take much to get him on board. >> it's a horrible dedisease, you know. and the best thing about this is raising awareness because there is nobody in this world that is not a effected somehow by breast cancer. >> so pick a tree and swing an ax at breast cancer. that way, you are going green will help pink
brown thing where the arkansas church awas attacked for putting on a play called merry christmas charlie brown. i didn't know this did you know charlie brown was a rabbi? >> where did you get that from? >> bill: i just made it up because this is so absurd that that would be the only reason that you would have to ban because then charlie brown would be a religious figure. >> the united states supreme court would say that's not the establishment of a particular religion. all i know is carlson is every day i come to work and i see attacks on judeo-christian tradition. >> see them because we listen now to the less than 1% in society majority of people who have enjoyed it for their lifetime. i don't remember these complaints when i was growing up. i don't remember any of them. and now what will my children be fighting for? what will my children -- they already -- we already have to as i have told you before, i kind of have to say hey, look, way in the backseat, way off beyond in the yonder you can see baby jesus maybe if there is a nativity scene anywhere. this is what we are doing now. we ar
with everybody from anthony brown's asian american orchestra to wane wallace's newest cd. who haven't you played with lately? yeah, he's played with everybody. you can find mas on a lot of different cd's from the local jazz community. this song we're going to do is an air called the brown-haired girl. when i was recording, when i was fortunate to be able to record bridge across the blue, i was telling them i got this air, i got it off the chieftan's album, i'm going to do it on the electric base. he looked at me and said, you're nuts. people are going to go crazy but if you can do it, i'll help you. he gave me this book of airs and went, figure it out, figure it out. it never quite jelled on the base but when hillary called today, i started to think more about the cedar flute. i said, i wonder if this particular air can fit? well, here we go. (instrumental music). >> thank you very much. i guess what i want to say about an arrangement like that is that it's not meant to use the cedar flute as a bit of exotica, but what the panelists have been speaking about. it's the use of all of it together is
government. and i think we always need to have that conversation about black and brown,mxr'a÷ and race, when we.é about education because i see that the city is taken off as far as -- industry without black and brown youth, and we're putting tags on black and brown children andé+ to prison because a lot of times these funding -- you know we come up with things that we think are going to work, and 2.7 million sounds a lot to some people. my bad. but whatever we come upc4ji' with,1lj÷ if it doesn't work let's just not keep sending the kids straight to jail. it's like we need to come up with more things to do whether it be finding more money or developing a self-supporting mechanism that produces human capital so that manufacturers human capital so that we can given some other type of capital to kids, as far as, you know, human capital, like education. thank you. god bless you all. >> president chiu: thanks. next speakerr@y,. >> i'll be using the overhead. this is my daughter, charlotte molinari. what i'm going to speak
be considered black. but officially jamaicans broke down in color into the shades white, olive, then light brown, then dark brown. then black. this was -- it was official. and if you guessed that it was better to be on the lighter end of that scale, you would be right. it made a huge difference in their potential for success even today. decades later. if you think that color test in jamaica didn't exist here in the united states, you would be dead wrong. there was something called the brown paper bag test. yes. in the u.s. it was started in the early 1900s. the african-american community. it was considered that if you were darker than a brown paper bag you weren't allowed to join certain social groups, fraternities, churches. 22-year-old teacher kiara lee does not want the lessons from the past to escape the youth of today and she's teaching young children the importance of something called colorism no matter how harsh that lesson is. soledad o'brien reports. >> we are even in the same grade. >> kiara lee recently graduate prosecuted the university of richmond. her passion is educating children
language a long brown coil, paraquillo looking like a cigar and tasting of brown sugar, well-beaten eggs and flour. this is the sign, according to the traveler, of the spoon used it eat the towering cream. we used to eat these big ice creams in cuba, used lots of cream. most dominica patrons were male but a few foreign women venturing to the famous establishment in the company of men from the court. one of these women was my grandmother, merced moynihan. in la dominica, one of the best cafes in the world, located on oreilly street, where my grandparents met. ticket to ride, i talk about my family history but after they marry -- i am reading a little from the book -- my grandparents were at the center of many fascinating things. i found myself at el centro, the literary and musical gatherings. their house on calle mercades became a cultural cross roads with the traffic of foreigners created a new inspired geography. they travel everywhere. my grandmother, merced, nina played the piano and read poems, while edward read the poems besides playing the fiddle and violin, behaved like an avant
dropped to a four year low. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, paul solman breaks down the latest report. and we debate the benefits of extending unemployment insurance amid washington's fiscal uncertainty. >> woodruff: then we turn to the
>> good friday morning to you. i am ainsley earhardt. >> i am patti ann browne. it is friday december 7th. thanks for watching "fox & friends first". >> it is time now for your 5@5:00. no end in sight for the crisis in cairo. >> clashes continuing over president mohammed morsi's power grab. protestors attacking officers of morsi's muslim brotherhood. a defiant morsi refusing to give up his powers. opposition are remnants of mubarek's regime. at least 6 people have been killed this week and dozens injured. obama is urging both sides to hold talks without preconditions. >>> vice president dick cheney offering scathing criticism of president obama's foreign policies. >> we have more territory in that part of the world when you start to add up all of the areas that have come or have come under the influence of muslim brotherhood and radical islamists. that part of the world piers to be muffling into a direction that is fundamentally hostile. >> he was being honored by the hudson institute for his contributions to the u.s. and government. >>> a day after hunters found two bodies i
to be with you. i'm terrell brown. a strong earthquake hit northeastern japan this morning, the magnitude 7.3 quake struck in the early evening in the same area that suffered a powerful quake and tsunami last year. a tsunami warning has been issued. residents have been told to move to higher ground. the fukushima nuclear plant has not been damaged. the quake was felt as far south as tokyo. lucy craft is in tokyo. what can you tell us? >> reporter: no reports of damage or injury. it's still way too early. we have a tsunami warning. the tide is about three feet or two meters or one meter, i should say. very interesting, this time the warnings came very fast and furious. the announcer was yelling at people to get to higher ground. big difference this year. >> we were watching in our newsroom as the alerts came in. what did you feel, what did you experience there? was it anything noticeable? >> i was talking to someone on the phone and she said she should get off the phone, this is a big one. my windows were rattling. my pictures, i thought i was going to have to grab them before they fell off.
. former mayor willie brown. [cheers and applause] and former mayor frank jordan. we want to acknowledge the husband of united states senator and former mayor dianne feinstein, mr. richard bloom. the wife of former mayor gina mos coney and the wife of former mayor joe alliteo, catherine. the sister of former mayor george christopher. the board board and the rest of the city family who has made this event possible. we are also honored to be joined by several giants dignitaries. president and ceo larry baer and his wife sam. [cheers and applause] . giants vice president and general manager brian saibian and his wife amanda. [cheers and applause] the wife of the skipper mrs. kim bochy. and let us now welcome distinguished members of the giants ownership group, charles johnson, david jenkins, trina and rob veen, tory and steven humphrey and allen baer. and we also joined by past giants owners. please welcome the family jamie and kim rupert and peter stoneum. also here with us today bob and connie laurie. peter and debbie mc clawlin. bill and sally newco. and now let's give it up for
the mime playing. anthony brown, who is a composer, is going to get a horn player to play something that is good but it's also someone who hasn't played in a while so it's a bit rusty. that's kind of tricky, but it had to be that because it couldn't be anything too complicated. he couldn't come up with this extraordinary riff set that made everyone kind of stand up and cheer. it had to be this sort of ragedy and yet truthful and sum up everything that's happened in the course of the play. but that's anthony brown's problem, not mine. >> so, anyway, i guess we should open this out to everyone out here. i'm sure you've got some questions that you'd like to ask phillip, so i'll be happy to take questions from the floor. over there in the red. >> can you explain again why the no no boys were rejected by the japanese community? i can understand if they said that they did not want to -- if they answered no no that the caucasian community would reject them, but i'm not sure where the japanese community rejected them. i felt like they were making a stand for the community. >> i think what's
friday. i am pamela brown in today or cynne simpson. >> i am steve chenevey. let's get to jacqui. >> it is better than yesterday morning. that is the good news. the bad news is that the clouds are back. we had some spotty showers out there. they are all very light. they are not in the metro. there is a chance we will see them in the mid to late morning hours. they return again. we will have a lot of ups and downs. we're talking about ups andwe have lots of clouds. today, not so much tomorrow, but into the rest of the weekend, on and off showers. a lot of back-and-forth. our express forecast -- cloudy with a spring shower at 9:00, cloudy skies at noon, and a chance of showers later on tonight. not the best of weekends. the temperatures will get a little bit warmer. it is time for traffic. >> it is off to a quiet start. we can only hope that it is not too crazy this morning. an awful, start to the district -- calm start for the district. i will give you the all clear. heading out of stafford pushing up through the project through to the beltway construction is gone. nothing right n
at the time which was arnold schwarzenegger and our attorney general at the time which was jerry brown, the current governor. both responded by refusing to defend the case and ultimately joined our side in the case and said it was fundamentally an unconstitutional law and they weren't going to defend it. so the judge in our case, chief judge von walker, who wrote that historic ruling in this case, allowed the intervening defendants, the propose pon ents of prop 8, to intervene and to defend the case. on the doma case the small group of folks on capitol hill out of the house have come together and are defending it because the federal government won't. at the end of the day this is unconstitutional and everyone knows it. >> it's a day in history here. this could be a major moment in the court's history. look at what tom goldstein of scotus blogged last week. quote, i have never before seen cases i believe would be discussed 200 years from now. bush v. gore, obama care were relative pip skeks. the government's assertion of the power to prohibit a gofg couple to marry or to refuse to recog
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with a timely manner within the brown act, something that this government seems to circumvent. many, many violations of the sunshine department are routine in this recreation and park department. cultivating the desecration of western culture. that is what is going on within this recreation and park department. if you cannot see either the ramifications or collateral damage this department has achieved, then you are seriously deceiving yourself and the general public. you have caused immense suffering, hardship and devastation to the bay area. city and county of san francisco and all of the people that have lived in it. it is similar to the feeling in benghazi. september 11th, 2012. nobody here to answer your concerns. nobody here that cares. nobody here that is watching what is really going on. thank you for your time. have a great day. and enjoy your thanksgiving. >> thank you. >> is there anyone else? richard, come forward. that is not this one. it is the next one. okay. richard. >> good morning, commissioners and general manager. i would like to speak in support of what's happening on
to chew on over thanksgiving. and hopefully you won't choke on it. september 11th, 2011 mayor willie brown, given advance warning of the nation's worst terrorist attack since pearl harbor. if only he had have told betty anne ong not to travel on september 11th, then we wouldn't have had to have -- >> i just have to remind you, that was a tragic event. i think you just have to show a little respect for that situation here in this room. >> absolutely. >> yet it was a very tragic event, september 11th. if you were in san francisco at that time, you were getting evicted from your stable, which was being managed by recreation and parks department and the commission here. you were told that you were going to get your facilities modernized. your stalls enlarged. that was ten years ago. you are sitting there asking me to have respect for september 11th? what if you owned a horses in san francisco september 11th, 2001. your tone would be a bit different, mr. buell. you seem to have total contempt for this city, the people that live in it. especially people that have recreational activities in it. y
up families and just go after brown people. >> reporter: he has a national reputation for aggressive enforcement of illegal immigration laws. he figured since he was coming to town he offered to come out to the middle school and talk to the students or at least the teachers or the principal. >> i'm concerned about parents given the wrong message to their kids even teachers in schools. because in class had to be controlled by a teacher. >> reporter: arpaio says the meeting today was suddenly cancelled by school officials he doesn't know why but he never believed the letters were from the children it was orchestrated effort by teacher or teachers to turn children against him. he doesn't mind being known as the sheriff who made inmates wear pink underwear or work on chain s but he doesn't want the -- gangs, but he didn't want the kids to think of him for something he never did. rereceived e-mail from the school saying the problem was scheduling and they would like sheriff arpaio to write them a letter so it could be read to the students in class. the sheriff says he's available this aft
wrapped in a flaky crust stuffed with a gooey center toasted up all golden brown then given a delicious design? a toaster strudel. pillsbury toaster strudel. so delicious...so fun. the stories behind them starting "right this minute." ♪ >> that clown taken down by a cop finally gets his day in court. >> with the red nose and all. >> see some clown outrage when the court is not of use. >> i will charge you $1,000 for that. >> for weeks a turkey plays a game of chicken with cars and ties up traffic. >> this is thanksgiving revenge. >> how the attempt to capture him leads to one maddening catch. >> goes down one but turkey is fine. >> it's being called the cutest video ever. see why everything is better in miniature. >>> plus, we'll show you how to make a toy for cheap and we'll try to explain this. >> i don't even know what to say. >> that is a clown right outside of the milwaukee city hall. >> a clown? >> a clown. >> bicycle with a teddy bear on the back. >> look at what happens when the cop approaches him? they get into a full-on fight and the whole thing was captured on video by a dr
. >> . >> soul? >> stephen: you could probably play james brown. you're the premiere performance capture artist. what's the difference between performance capture and motion capture? >> performance capture is the later iteration if you like. you may use that word. motion capture is basically what you used back in the day with video games where you have a martial artist. >> stephen: ping-pong becauses. >> performance capture is basically capturing the entire performance in one hit. we can be doing a scene hereby the live action camera is filming you, and a head-mounted camera captures the entire performance in one hit. you don't have to go back and repeat anything. it's just another way of recording an actor's performance. >> stephen: when we were in new zealand last year on set for the hobit, i went over-- mr. jackson showed me a little cut of the film and we have a clip to show the audience. it's part of the riddle theme. i saw this with just you. and then i saw it, and it's all you. i saw-- >> it is not all me. >> stephen: it is, it's all you. it's extraordinary. jim, show him what i'm tal
will take credit for all three counties. i told jerry, i'm never going to complain to jerry brown, what he to happen in the state legislature, because i used the first year and a half to insulate myself from all of that, emotionally as well as programmatically to say i'm not going to let the state hurt our city or the federal government. we've got to innovate our way out of this economic dole drum and we are doing so with inviting people here. those of you who take this word challenge, and really can really seriously bring that to fore with your best ideas, this is what i'm doing with all these technology companies. i'm not satisfied with just hosting a new company in the city, i want to know what they're doing, who's working there, where they're coming from, what they plan for the five or 10 years and how we can help them grow. as they're growing their jobs i want to know technologically how we can help. that's why i love going to accelerators, to find out what are the next five years that we're incubating so when it comes like what happened last week with dr. yam naka working at gladston
we can keep a certain part of our scriblth, black and brown kids, from falling behind. and if we're able to make this kind of allocation with our general fund dollars, with our state fund reserve dollars we can help close the achievement gap, we can make sure young people can graduate, can get on to higher education, can get on the way to find a pathway into our growing economy, that right now is falling -- is causing them to fall behind. because we're not providing the kind of safety net or education program and our job placement programs that can really help bring them up. this is a choice we have today. i totally support it and i hope we can actually find the votes to have a veto proof majority in making this go forward. >> president chiu: supervisor >> supervisor olague: -- kim and her staff for all the work on this and i wanted to refer to an article that was in yesterday's paper, and it's kind of an odd title but it was black boy see bleak future at school. it stated one out of four african-american boys in california is convinced he will fail in school, driven in part by p
decade. so ditch the brown bag for something better. like our bacon ranch quesadillas or big mouth burger bites, served with soup or salad, and fries. starting at just 6 bucks, at chili's. ♪ santa claus is coming to town ♪ >>> president obama and the first lady and their daughters belting out christmas carols with neil patrick harris and a host of other entertainers. the sing along followed the lighting of the annual christmas tree. the newly transplanted 28-foot blue spruce as thousands looked on. >>> now, for a look at your morning road conditions today. a slick commute around portland and seattle. snowy roads in the cascades, northern rockieses and upper midwest. highways will be wet from chicago to new york. >> if you're flying, airport delays possible in minneapolis, and on the east coast, in new york, boston and philadelphia. >>> and back to the news this morning. a heartbreaking survival story for a woman stranded in the snow on california's sierra nevada mountains. >> paula lane and her boyfriend were missing nearly a week after their car was stuck in a snowstorm. clifton froz
in the auditorium that knows what i am talking about. michael [inaudible] lynn brown, jerad bloomfield and others. we make trips to sacramento and we do what we could in the bay view. we put solar on all 58 homes and so on and so forth. in the beginning of this discussion i heard something about climate change and then i was paying attention to this conversation and there's a lot of fluff. so much fluff it gives you a headache. now, if you look at a map and some of you have done the outreach, whatever way you did the outreach, if you want to pay attention to the carbon footprint you have to do anything for the people that are impacted in district 10 and 11 and if you haven't done that to the best of your ability you have failed, so don't tell us in the areas that are green, which is where mostly the rich people live, where they send all their garbage, where they send all their sewage to which is in district 10 and you do service -- when it comes to outreach. that has to be ratified immediately. now, we need empirical data from this so-called consultants because sfpuc has this habit to have c
browne dianis. thank you so much. let me ask judith to start with some homework that we couldn't do but we're counting on to you do. people come up to me and said, i was so angry about some of the suppression talk and attempts in those 30-some states. african-americans would say i got out there and i voted. what evidence do you have that it really worked in favor, or rather put it this way, against the republicans for trying to do that? >> well, number one, we know that they tried to do it so that they could have partisan advantage, but we do know it backfired because, number one, organizations like mine were able to stop them dead in their tracks by bringing litigation. but, two, we know that voters were standing in line. in fact, i stood in line in maryland for seven hours, and i will tell you, chris, that the discussion in that line and in an all-black precinct -- seven hours -- people said this is about voter suppression. they don't want us to vote. this is an old playbook. people are used to it. they see it coming and they say, no, we're not going to allow them to silence us an
mean, my father was the director of safety and security for brown foreman over 20 years. >> he was an in store santa claus, wasn't me? >> yes. in his retirement. in his retirement. >> he was very keen on safety and that. you were very aware. >> yes, yes. as a kid growing up, i mean, his nickname is safety man. my dad was in my house with my all the time. and my mom was, too. and, you know, this idea that my house was somehow, you know, halfway built or any of those kinds of things, it is just absurd. it is absurd. and so, the person that came up with the ashes story was me. you know? i was bereaved that when i went to bed and saw the box next to the mud room, or i'm sorry in the mud room next to the door i thought, oh, i should put that outside. and then i thought, no, it's okay. i vividly remember this. of course i do. and so, i went to bed. when i got up, i came out the front on to the front top of the porch. i looked around. and i saw my parent's bedroom windows and i looked up. there was no flame there. and i looked back and the way that my house was built i could go all th
them now. and cbs5 political insider and former mayor willie brown and greg surr, you made a big bust o o of a ring, and the haul was high-tech toys like cell phones. what do you make of that. >> it's no surprise. there's been 1700 cell phones stolen in san francisco just so far this year. and, you know, so when you hit it and get a whole bunch of the cell cell phones, laptops, cameras, watches, you name it, in fact the phone is ringing right now. >> i'll call you right back. >> and it's just that kind of, who calls at 7:00 in the morning. that's brutal. i thought that only happened to me. >> they never let me sleep. >> you know that. >> they never let me sleep. what is it about these things that make them so attractive to thieves. >> they're so transactional. they're easily portable, easy to resell. i've drawn the analogy, it's like walking around with $300 in your hand. >> you go and bust these people, what is it that they can do so fast that makes them valuable. >> you can sell them on the street real quickly. they have kiosks where you can drop it in and it is dispense cash in excha
you want. walmart. >>> a young woman uses a brown paper bag to show kids a tough lesson on the history of judging people by their skin color. soledad o'brien has more on today's segment of "black in america." >> -- even in the same grade. >> reporter: kiara lee recently graduated from the university of richmond. her passion is educating children about colorism. >> tell me about that. why did the teacher not call on him? >> because she ugly. >> reporter: she is 7 years old and her mother is worried her little girl is already getting the message, dark skin is bad. >> i think my skin is ugly. >> why do you think it's ugly? >> because i don't want to be dark. >> you don't want to be dark? >> no. i want to be light skinned. >> why? >> because light skinned is pretty. >> you think so? >> yes. >> can somebody tell me what that means? >> my stance is, teach the children what it is, show them the history, make them aware of this issue so that when they go to school, when they go out in the world, they're armed with this information. because he wants to buy her, because her skin is lighter. you
's been wrapped in a flaky crust stuffed with a gooey center toasted up all golden brown then given a delicious design? a toaster strudel. pillsbury toaster strudel. so delicious...so fun. >>> how would you like to visit the moon? a new space tourism company wants to make that reality. it's called the golden spike company. it was founded by a group of space veterans, including a former nasa executive and a former apollo flight director. the group hopes to use existing rockets and a new lander to send expeditions to the moon. i'm over the moon on this. unfortunately, it's not going to be cheap. two tickets will set you back $1.4 million. the company says international space agencies will likely be their biggest customer. they hope to make the first expedition in 2020. >> or you could go to hawaii. you know what i mean? if i had the choice, there's a few caribbean islands i'd like to visit as well. >> that's not enough for everybody. more than hawaii. >> the beach and the sunshine. that's all i need. >> sun or the moon. which one would you rather have? coming up on 5:41 now. time to g
. we've got a kids cafe program. we've got senior brown bags, mobile pantries and there are over 700 nonprofit agencies that we partner with throughout the washington metro area. >> as people are coming out, what is the best thing for them to bring? >> healthy foods we have a healthy dozen list now. applesauce, peanut butter, canned spinach, all the items that you know are healthy for you are healthy for others. we are live at four different -- there are basic giants that we have the big teams at. but there are 16 participating giants. >> correct. >> how can people make the most of a trip to giant. >> i think giant has $5 bag already premade so can you just give them $5, buy it and they'll bring it out to us or can you bring it out to us yourself. >> we talk about this every euro. it is not about just helping the homeless not to be hungry. there are people that go to work hungry ever day. >> we are seeing college students, people who used to be donors to the food bank are now needing our services. >> there are a lot of people taking time to come out and donate. in fact, i think there
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